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Embedded World

Overview

Learn about the latest embedded systems development technologies and techniques from AUTOSAR based ECUs, to connected Smart Meters to IoT medical devices by visiting the Mentor Graphics, booth, Hall 4/4-422, at the upcoming Embedded World Exhibition and Conference.

Enter for a chance to win a GoPro HERO 3+ Camera by learning how the Connected Engineering™ approach from Mentor accelerates your innovation.

View the following demonstrations - Hall 4/4-422

  • Creating Automotive Infotainment (IVI) system based on Linux
  • Designing AUTOSAR 4.x based engine control units (ECUs)
  • Deploying a hypervisor to consolidate functionality on multi-core processors
  • Using multi-core heterogeneous processors
  • Implementing inter-processor communication
  • Delivering high performance graphical applications
  • Adding connectivity through Bluetooth Low Energy for IoT devices
  • Minimizing power consumption for handheld and battery operated IoT devices
  • Increasing system reliability with an intelligent next generation RTOS

Attend the conference for the following papers by our team

  1. Power Management in Embedded Systems - Colin Walls (2/25/14 14:00 – 14:30)
  2. Explore Hardware and Software Strategies to Design Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 2.0 Compliant Devices - Andrew Caples – (2/25/14 16:00 – 16:30)
  3. A Closer Look at AUTOSAR Design Automation - Armin Lichtblau – (2/26/14 13:30 – 14:00)
  4. Pre-Silicon Software Development - Russ Klein – (2/26/14 16:00 – 16:30)
  5. Interprocessor Communications and MCAPI - Colin Walls – 11:30 – 12:00
  6. Developing the Next Generation Embedded HMIs - Phil Brumby – 2/26/14 (13:30 – 14:30)
  7. Analyzing and Solving UI Performance Problems on Embedded Hardware - Phil Brumby 2/26/14 (16:30 – 17:00)
  8. Linux Fast Boot: Techniques for Aggressive Boot Time Reduction - Andrew Patterson – 2/26/14 (11:30 – 12:00)
  9. Linux-based Automotive Software: Some Unexpected Challenges, Some Interesting Solutions - Andrew Patterson 2/26/14 (15:30 – 16:00)
  10. Including Android into Your Infotainment System - Andrew Patterson 2/27/14 (11:00 – 11:45)
  11. Challenges in Automotive Connectivity: Devices, Technologies, and the Connected Car - Andrew Patterson 2/27/14 (9:30 – 10:00)

Power Management in Embedded Systems
Colin Walls - 2/25/14 (14:00 – 14:30)

The importance of power management in today’s embedded designs has been steadily growing as an increasing number of battery powered devices are developed. Often power optimizations are left to the very end of the project cycle, almost as an afterthought. In this presentation we will discuss design considerations that should be made when starting a new power sensitive embedded design, which include choosing the hardware with desired capabilities, defining a hardware architecture that will allow software to dynamically control power consumption, defining appropriate power usage profiles, making the appropriate choice of an operating system and drivers, choosing measurable power goals and providing these goals to the software development team to track throughout the development process.

Explore Hardware and Software Strategies to Design Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 2.0 Compliant Devices
Andrew Caples – 2/25/14 (16:00 – 16:30)

The Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 2.0 is quickly becoming the go-to standard for developing innovative connected products and services for the smart grid. Information flow between meters, smart appliances, and energy management systems must seamlessly occur in an open, standardized, and interoperable fashion. The SEP 2.0 specification establishes a standard for communication interoperability and security for networked appliances and meters participating in a smart grid. In this session you will learn about the requirements to develop a SEP 2.0 compliant device and explore the hardware and software strategies you can apply to address the connectivity and security requirements laid out by the SEP 2.0 specification.

A Closer Look at AUTOSAR Design Automation
Armin Lichtblau – 2/26/14 (13:30 – 14:00)

AUTOSAR 4.3.0 is now being deployed by many of the world’s top automotive OEMs. Unfortunately, many of the Tier 1 suppliers are struggling with AUTOSAR complexity. Significant effort is being spent on behalf of the OEMs in the design, migration, configuration, integration, generation, and in the final build of AUTOSAR-based systems. In order for the Tier 1 suppliers to participate, a fundamental change is required at the software and tools companies to abstract away the AUTOSAR standard. The presentation gives an overview of the current situation, possibilities, and future direction of abstracting AUTOSAR for design automation purposes.

Pre-Silicon Software Development
Russ Klein – 2/26/14 (16:00 – 16:30

Designs before they commit them to silicon. These tools allow the hardware designer to create a completely accurate and functioning model of the device they are going to produce, and enables them to run it and test it in a virtual environment. As designs have become more complicated, and the verification challenges faced by the hardware developer more daunting, some hardware description languages have become more abstract. Leaving behind some of the hardware implementation details they can deliver much higher performance and start to enable system level verification. To enable both high levels of detail and performance, the hardware descriptions can be “compiled” (through a series of hardware development tools) into programmable hardware, targeting either emulation systems1 or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs)2. Hardware design teams are even combining these approaches to create hybrid platforms which have specific detail and performance characteristics needed to validate specific facets of their design. If these hardware descriptions include processors - and they almost always do today - these accurate and functioning representations of the hardware can be used to execute software. In fact, hardware developers will often program the processors in their virtual design to interact with the surrounding hardware to verify certain aspects of it. This is becoming essential as software is taking an increasing role in the functionality of these designs. But is it practical to use any of the hardware designer’s “virtual devices” to enable earlier development of software? This session will survey the various approaches that the hardware designers might use to model a new design, specifically considering the performance, accuracy, and debug-ability of those platforms from a software developer’s perspective. We will look at what types of software could be executed and debugged in the context of these platforms, and how to best take advantage of them to get a jump on software development. Finally, we will walk through an example of the development and debug of an embedded Linux device driver for a peripheral which has not yet been produced in silicon.

Interprocessor Communications and MCAPI
Colin Walls – 2/27/14 (11:30 – 12:00
)

MCAPI is a standardized API for communication and synchronization between closely distributed cores and/or processors in embedded systems, defined and maintained by the Multicore Association. This session outlines what MCAPI is, how it works and how it may be deployed in multicore systems. Included is a complete review of the API and example code to illustrate its usage.

Developing the Next Generation Embedded HMIs
Phil Brumby – 2/26/14 (13:30 – 14:30)

With more people using smartphones it’s no surprise that users are demanding better HMIs in other products whether it’s a set-top box, refrigerator, or car – end-users have come to expect graphically rich and dynamic HMIs. This is all very well, but what is a humble developer to do when confronted with the constraints of their embedded device? This presentation examines the options available to embedded developers who are looking to implement these latest HMIs and discusses tools and techniques that can help developers meet or exceed their customer’s HMI expectations.

Analyzing and Solving UI Performance Problems on Embedded Hardware
Phil Brumby 2/26/14 (16:30 – 17:00)

When developing UIs for embedded devices, it’s not uncommon to hit performance problems on target hardware – whether the UI start-up takes too long, animation is slow, or the UI isn’t responsive enough. The source of many embedded UI performance problems are system level problems originating outside or within the UI layer. This presentation provides practical guidance to developers on how to solve these common UI problems on target embedded hardware. This session demonstrates tools and techniques to help developers analyze these problems (ranging from the humble printf, to more sophisticated trace tools). Guidance will be backed up by examples of using these techniques to solve real-world Qt UI problems.

Linux Fast Boot: Techniques for Aggressive Boot Time Reduction
Andrew Patterson – 2/26/14 (11:30 – 12:00)

Linux has become the de facto standard embedded operating system for a great variety of devices. A growing number of devices require startup times that can be very challenging to achieve with any operating system. A number of techniques can be employed to significantly reduce the time it takes to boot a Linux-based embedded system. This session presents and discusses techniques and technologies available to configure a rapid-boot Linux system covering hardware, software, and firmware elements.

Linux-based Automotive Software: Some Unexpected Challenges, Some Interesting Solutions
Andrew Patterson 2/26/14 (15:30 – 16:00)

Linux-based software is running in multiple vehicle systems on the road today, including instrument clusters and infotainment systems. Some of the challenges designers have had to overcome (licensing and use of open source software) were predicable, but others were completely unexpected. Automotive alliances like GENIVI have first identified and then addressed some of these concerns, and a range of commercial organizations have built differentiated commercial solutions for the automotive market. This presentation explores how Linux has made a home for itself in vehicles and the operating system features that are well-suited to in-vehicle use. The issues around licensing, integration with in-vehicle systems, and the distribution and linking to commercial software will also be discussed.

Including Android into Your Infotainment System
Andrew Patterson 2/27/14 (11:00 – 11:45)

Android has successfully been deployed in production in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems as the primary operating system, but some car makers are concerned about the security and future roadmap for Android. What other choices are there? This session looks at a number of techniques for linking Android to IVI systems, including tethering techniques with “VNC Open” and its derivatives, Linux Containers, and multi-domain systems based on hypervisor technology. By attending this session attendees will be in a better position to select the right technical solution for their IVI development needs and understand the differing development efforts and trade-offs in terms of domain isolation and functionality each architecture approach offers.

Challenges in Automotive Connectivity: Devices, Technologies, and the Connected Car
Andrew Patterson2/27/14 (9:30 – 10:00)

With the dramatic mismatch between consumer handheld devices and automobiles in terms of product lifespan and the speed at which new features are deployed, vehicle manufacturers are faced with a dilemma. If the connected car is to succeed, there has to be a secure and accessible method to update software in a vehicle’s infotainment system, as well as a real or perceived way to graft in new content. This challenge has become even more evident as we transition from traditional analog audio systems, to a new world in which configurable and interactive Internet-based content rules the day. This presentation explores available options for updating and extending the software capability of a vehicle’s infotainment system in an effort to address the lifecycle mismatch between automobiles (five to eight years) and consumer devices (six months to two years).

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