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IESF: System Modeling and Analysis

Learn more about the latest tools and innovations for Automotive, Commercial Vehicle, and Off-highway System Modeling & Analysis at IESF 2013 - Dearborn, MI, USA - September 19th, 2013.

Highlights include dedicated breakout track, case studies and solution demonstrations in the product area. Topics covered include Model-based Design of Automotive Electrical Distribution Systems, with a joint presentation from Ford and Mentor Graphics on how they are tackling this subject together.

Featured System Modeling & Analysis Events

A New, No-Compromise Hardware Option that Will Meet Your Cost, Schedule & Risk Budgets Thursday, September 19, 9:55 AM

Guest Speaker Reducing carbon footprint, fitting more functionality in a limited space, improving reliability and safety, and meeting the local needs of global markets are increasing requirements in automotive hardware development projects. Meeting these increasing needs and simultaneously reducing cost seems almost impossible. A Via Configurable ASIC (VCA) can be an optimal solution to address these challenges. VCA technology integrates silicon-proven analog and digital resources onto pre-configured ASIC arrays requiring only a single via mask layer to customize the design and finalize the manufacturing process. VCAs offer a dramatically reduced-cost alternative to ASIC design, supporting both low volumes and fast development cycles. This session discusses and demonstrates how a systems or application engineer, with no IC design or modeling experience, can quickly develop and test their own custom mixed-signal integrated circuit. Instead of picking discrete and COTS parts from a catalog, the engineer can design a circuit interactively in a simple, schematic-based design environment, test it, and then have it quickly implemented in a VCA platform. The design environment (built on SystemVision from Mentor Graphics) also supports multi-discipline system development and verfication of the chip in the context of its resident system.

Multi-Domain Simulation for Advanced Alternator Control Thursday, September 19, 9:55 AM

Guest Speaker In today’s automotive electronics, the study of systems is linked to disparate physical domains that must interact with each other. For vehicles in particular, the electrical system is a multi-domain design comprised mainly of an alternator and battery connected to multiple loads. Valeo uses multi-domain simulation to design alternator control, combining digital and analog electronics with the thermal and mechanical domains in a single simulation. This is achieved using the VHDL-AMS modeling language, which is an IEEE standard for modeling mixed-signal and multi-domain systems. This session introduces the design of a regulation loop, complete with adapted correctors, for an alternator regulator, and shows the advantages of mixed-signal, multi-domain simulation prior to prototype development. In particular, the design focuses on system stability. Finally, the presentation concludes with a discussion on multi-domain simulation.

In-vehicle Networking Simulation: Both Sides of the Story Thursday, September 19, 2:10 PM

Technical Session Renault sees complex electrical architectures using multiple networks and different protocols, mainly CAN and LIN, as normal in modern automobiles. Simple rules for CAN network topology design were sufficient in the past; however, today they are not adequate for quick development cycles or for a high level of complexity. Today’s design engineer must consider how the increase of data exchange due to the increase in the number of electronic control units communicating with each other can be integrated into the electrical architecture in a timely and cost-efficient manner. Using simulation has become a “must have” for this purpose, one which Renault has integrated into its development process. Technical points that can be verified in an in-vehicle networking simulation are basically one of two types: 1) Electrical Signal Integrity for nominal cases (propagation time, rise-time measurement, ringing, etc.). This can be verified with automatically drawn topologies as long as the simulation models (e.g., the transceiver) are available and qualified. 2) EMC robustness (especially radiated immunity) of topologies, which requires a step forward, such as import of 3D models of the vehicle and the position of the CAN cable inside the car. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of what Renault does in terms of in-vehicle networking simulation and the benefits of this kind of simulation.

Model-based Design of Automotive Electrical Distribution Systems - Challenges & Solutions Thursday, September 19, 3:00 PM

Technical Session Despite the cost of vehicle late repairs, or the cost of grounding aircraft, early analysis is rarely given a high priority. This presentation considers how simulation and analysis techniques can be applied in an electrical distribution system design flow. It will discuss critical model-based design elements such as early system simulation, advanced interpretive analysis such as DC, functional quantitative, and Failure Modes & Effects Analysis (FMEA). This presentation will explore how the designs, at various stages of maturity, can be analyzed, thereby enhancing product quality. This presentation will discuss current challenges in virtually prototyping an electrical distribution system. Solutions and techniques to address these challenges using various analysis and simulation tools will be discussed.

F = Full registration required

General
  • Electrical Simulation & Analysis Using The Simplest Of Models
    Toggle Abstract

    TECHNICAL SESSION Compressed development cycles drive increased focus on virtual development, including simulation and analysis of electrical system designs. However, one hurdle often cited is the effort needed to develop detailed models of components such as wires, fuses and ECUs. This presentation shows that it is fully possible to obtain reliable and surprisingly accurate results using the simplest of models. By placing these models in a re-usable library and providing a simple, visual interaction environment, early design debugging using a computer becomes possible for every electrical engineer.

Presenter: Nigel Hughes, Technical Director, Integrated Electrical Systems, Mentor Graphics
  • Model-based & Implementation-based Test Generation
    Toggle Abstract

    TECHNICAL SESSION The development of an efficient bug-free system remains a myth. Testing continues to be a major challenge, if not the most fundamental challenge, in embedded systems development. It consumes the most time during embedded systems development. Traditional validation techniques are based on hardware-in-the-loop tests, while algorithm and software developers use model-in-the-loop tests to validate their systems. Both efforts are usually separated, with few tests being reused. With the growing emphasis on safety-critical functionality, and the growing complexities of embedded systems, software test and reliable behavior are ever more critical. However, existing solutions still tend to be localized, tailored, time consuming and not extendable.

    This presentation will introduce a graph-based testing environment that ensures rapid and efficient system stimulus generation, a co-simulation solution that allows tests to be executed against different platforms/IDEs (namely Matlab/Simulink climate control model and AUTOSAR SWC simulation on VFB), automated test results verification, requirements-based coverage, and finally the ability to extend this solution to different domains. Use-cases will show that the proposed environment leads to better products, faster tests design and development, and lower production costs.

Presenter: Ghada Bahig, Engineering Manager, System Level Engineering, Mentor Graphics
  • Reducing Time to Market using Model Driven Development for Design, Verification & Test
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    TECHNICAL SESSION This presentation will show how Model Driven Development can address common challenges in the system design, verification, and testing of complex systems and systems of systems. Project success requires that hardware, software, and test teams fluently integrate application software, controlling firmware, analog and digital hardware, and mechanical components. Successfully integrating and verifying such a complex multi-disciplinary system often proves to be costly in terms of time, money, and engineering resources. This presentation covers the Model Driven Development of a virtual prototype that supports system engineering teams along with software, digital hardware, analog hardware, system interconnect algorithm development, hardware/software co-simulation, and virtual system integration using a tools flow emphasizing requirements tracing, UML/SysML system modeling, and linking to functionality FPGA, IC, and PCB domains.

Presenter: Bill Chown, Marketing Manager, System Level Engineering, Mentor Graphics
  • Tackling Your Mechatronic System Design Challenges
    Toggle Abstract

    TECHNICAL SESSION If you design automotive systems, you no doubt deal with mechatronic elements at some point in your design cycle. Mechatronic technologies make possible many advances in modern automotive systems design. Historically non-electrical systems are being improved using combinations of sensors, actuators, electronics, and software. The benefits are tangible and measurable: better performance, higher reliability, and a safer ride. Mechatronic systems enable features and functionality that, until recently, design teams could only wish for. But designing a system that takes full advantage of mechatronic technologies is beyond the repeated “design > prototype > test” cycles of typical design processes. Getting a mechatronic system from specification to implementation within ever-shrinking market windows requires a shift in development methodology, where lab-based design and troubleshooting are shifted to the virtual world of modeling and simulation. Design teams need tools and techniques that assemble multiple mechatronic system disciplines into a single design and analysis environment.

    This session presents an innovative mechatronic system integration capability featuring SystemVision, Mentor Graphics’ solution for complex mechatronic system development. You will learn how SystemVision uses standards-based modeling, and advanced simulation and analysis capabilities, to help automotive design teams combine mechatronic system elements into a single, comprehensive modeling and analysis environment. Join us to see how SystemVision's standards-based modeling, and advanced simulation and analysis capabilities, can help you tackle your mechatronic system design challenges.

Presenter: Mike Jensen, Product Marketing Engineer, System Level Engineering, Mentor Graphics
Guest Speakers
  • A New, No-Compromise Hardware Option that Will Meet Your Cost, Schedule & Risk Budgets
    Toggle Abstract

    GUEST SPEAKER Reducing carbon footprint, fitting more functionality in a limited space, improving reliability and safety, and meeting the local needs of global markets are increasing requirements in automotive hardware development projects. Meeting these increasing needs and simultaneously reducing cost seems almost impossible. A Via Configurable ASIC (VCA) can be an optimal solution to address these challenges. VCA technology integrates silicon-proven analog and digital resources onto pre-configured ASIC arrays requiring only a single via mask layer to customize the design and finalize the manufacturing process. VCAs offer a dramatically reduced-cost alternative to ASIC design, supporting both low volumes and fast development cycles.

    This session discusses and demonstrates how a systems or application engineer, with no IC design or modeling experience, can quickly develop and test their own custom mixed-signal integrated circuit. Instead of picking discrete and COTS parts from a catalog, the engineer can design a circuit interactively in a simple, schematic-based design environment, test it, and then have it quickly implemented in a VCA platform. The design environment (built on SystemVision from Mentor Graphics) also supports multi-discipline system development and verfication of the chip in the context of its resident system.

Presenter: Reid Wender, Vice President of Marketing & Technical Sales, Triad Semiconductor
  • In-vehicle Networking Simulation: Both Sides of the Story
    Toggle Abstract

    TECHNICAL SESSION Renault sees complex electrical architectures using multiple networks and different protocols, mainly CAN and LIN, as normal in modern automobiles. Simple rules for CAN network topology design were sufficient in the past; however, today they are not adequate for quick development cycles or for a high level of complexity. Today’s design engineer must consider how the increase of data exchange due to the increase in the number of electronic control units communicating with each other can be integrated into the electrical architecture in a timely and cost-efficient manner. Using simulation has become a “must have” for this purpose, one which Renault has integrated into its development process.

    Technical points that can be verified in an in-vehicle networking simulation are basically one of two types: 1) Electrical Signal Integrity for nominal cases (propagation time, rise-time measurement, ringing, etc.). This can be verified with automatically drawn topologies as long as the simulation models (e.g., the transceiver) are available and qualified. 2) EMC robustness (especially radiated immunity) of topologies, which requires a step forward, such as import of 3D models of the vehicle and the position of the CAN cable inside the car. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of what Renault does in terms of in-vehicle networking simulation and the benefits of this kind of simulation.

Presenter: Vincent Bidault, Engineer, Embedded Network Specialist, Renault
  • Model-based Design of Automotive Electrical Distribution Systems - Challenges & Solutions
    Toggle Abstract

    TECHNICAL SESSION Despite the cost of vehicle late repairs, or the cost of grounding aircraft, early analysis is rarely given a high priority. This presentation considers how simulation and analysis techniques can be applied in an electrical distribution system design flow. It will discuss critical model-based design elements such as early system simulation, advanced interpretive analysis such as DC, functional quantitative, and Failure Modes & Effects Analysis (FMEA). This presentation will explore how the designs, at various stages of maturity, can be analyzed, thereby enhancing product quality. This presentation will discuss current challenges in virtually prototyping an electrical distribution system. Solutions and techniques to address these challenges using various analysis and simulation tools will be discussed.

Presenter: Asaad Makki, Ford Motor Company
Presenter: Enrique Ortega, Transportation Business Director for North America, Mentor Graphics
  • Multi-Domain Simulation for Advanced Alternator Control
    Toggle Abstract

    GUEST SPEAKER In today’s automotive electronics, the study of systems is linked to disparate physical domains that must interact with each other. For vehicles in particular, the electrical system is a multi-domain design comprised mainly of an alternator and battery connected to multiple loads.

    Valeo uses multi-domain simulation to design alternator control, combining digital and analog electronics with the thermal and mechanical domains in a single simulation. This is achieved using the VHDL-AMS modeling language, which is an IEEE standard for modeling mixed-signal and multi-domain systems. This session introduces the design of a regulation loop, complete with adapted correctors, for an alternator regulator, and shows the advantages of mixed-signal, multi-domain simulation prior to prototype development. In particular, the design focuses on system stability. Finally, the presentation concludes with a discussion on multi-domain simulation.

Presenter: Pierre Chassard, Electronics Senior Expert, Valeo Engine and Electrical Systems