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What’s New at Intel?

John Day

John Day

Posted Jun 13, 2014
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We hadn’t heard a lot from Intel lately, but that changed this week. Seems it never rains but it pours. The company not only introduced Intel® In-Vehicle Solutions, which it described as a family of hardware and software products, but also announced automotive technology-related research projects, investments, and collaborations with several other automotive systems developers.

Intel® In-Vehicle Solutions includes hardware modules, operating system and middleware software, and development kits, all intended to make it easier and less costly for automakers to deliver the kind of in-vehicle experiences that consumers demand. Presumably those experiences include a lot of connectivity.

Intel said its Internet of Things Group achieved revenue of $482 million in the first quarter, up 32% year-over-year, thanks largely to strong demand for in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems. Technology that will power the future of driving is evolving quickly, and Intel believes that its combination of research, investments and new products will help bring future driving experiences to market faster.

“Our goal is to fuel the evolution from convenience features available in the car today to enhanced safety features of tomorrow and eventually self-driving capabilities,” said Doug Davis, corporate vice president, Internet of Things Group.

12 Months Sooner, 50 Percent Less
Specifically, Intel believes that its standardized platform approach can shorten infotainment development time by more than 12 months and reduce costs by up to 50 percent.

Research projects underway or planned include a “Personal Vehicle Experience” project to understand the joys and pain points that people experience when using their cars, and a “Secure My Connected Car” project to better understand the challenges and threat landscape of connected cars. The latter project involves memory protection for defending in-vehicle hardware and software, and McAfee whitelisting technology from Intel Security.

Other research projects are engaging ethnographers, anthropologists and engineers. Projects are aimed at making roads safer, and learning the most effective ways that drivers can interact with their cars.

In 2012, Intel established the $100 million Intel Capital Connected Car Fund to speed up the industry’s transition to seamless connectivity between cars and consumer devices, and to drive new technologies that will enable future autonomous driving capabilities. The latest investment from the Intel fund goes to ZMP, developers of an autonomous driving platform and vehicles connected with sensors, radars and cameras.

Other investments include CloudMade, provider of data aggregation and cloud connectivity for future IVI solutions; Mocana, which delivers security to the IVI platform with a mobile app-shielding solution, and Tobii Technology, which applies perceptual computing technology to advanced driver assistance applications.
Intel technology is currently used in BMW’s Navigation System Professional for all its vehicle models, the Infiniti InTouch infotainment system in the Infiniti Q50, and the Driver Information System in the all-new 2015 Hyundai Genesis. Ecosystem-wise, Intel’s collaborators include its Wind River subsidiary, Green Hills Software, Mobica, Symphony Teleca, QNX, and XSe.

We’ll keep an eye out for more Intel news.

XSe, Wind River, QNX, cloud connectivity, sensors, Symphony Teleca, Tobii Technology, autonomous driving, Green Hills Software, Intel In-Vehicle Solutions, Hyundai Genesis, IVI systems, CloudMade, McAfee, Mobica, driver information system, intel, Infiniti Q50, Intel Capital Connected Car Fund, ZMP

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John DayJohn Day recently launched John Day’s Automotive Electronics News (johndayautomotivelectronics.com) to provide news and feature coverage of the automotive electronics industry. Earlier he wrote for Auto Electronics magazine, Auto E-lectronics, EE Times, and other business and engineering publications. Visit John Day

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